Richard G. Miller Mission September 16, 1942

Sept. 19.

Well much has happened. First it was a commando raid on Tobruk - not too successful but they did a lot of damage and from reports didn't lose too many men. The air support was perfect, better than they had ever hoped for - but it was costly. The American B-25 group lost its C.O., a Colonel, the British lost a Group Captain, etc. Our boys made Bg. (All of them) and stayed up and played hide and seek with the Ak-Ak half the nite. Bouquets to those navigators of ours - for it was a hell of a hard job to find it with no moon!!

Two days ago I went on a flight that should have established some records. We flew from here, Lydda, to Jamalia, Cairo, to Bg. and back the same way. Took off by 8:00 a.m. and hit Bg. about 1:30 p.m., landed back at Lydda at 7:30 p.m. which meant 12 hours of formation flying. Have never been any more tired than I was that nite. It was tough going as it was my turn to do the flying over the target. That flight must have set the record for the longest daylight operation ever chalked up, for it was not long after sun up that we got off the ground and after dark ,when we landed. Too, we believe it was the longest formation flight ever recorded, for our planes are the longest range craft to this date. 'Tis impossible to describe the terrific physical exertion of flying hour after hour, concentrating on not getting too far out or not over-running. True we had pilot and co-pilot, but it was enough to whip both of us. The 98th went in trail and 159 group of Libs hit just after we did. Saw pursuit - leader of 98th got several thru his ship, but no personnel hit. We were lucky and got hits on three ships.

Ebert yanked his stick right across "Harry" (sunken, concreted ship) and one we were after, starting huge fires. Kirkcaldy (Capt. Nav-bomb) salvoed right into one other ships. Col. McGuire led the flight and really worked us out - we had to climb at 135 and these ship~ don't operate for hell under 150; but yet the Col. made a good run on the target. However, there was no excuse for his flight to the target for we had warned him of just what we raise hell with him now for. Anyway, when a raid is a success ,and we have no casualties, we can overlook a lot.

Got a jolt today when I received a letter from Muriel dated July 23rd saying she was marrying D. Guinn - have wondered long about that ever since Lynch rumored such. Gad, I guess I'm not such a shrewd judge of human beings after all, for I'd have staked a lot on her playing square. Oh well, so it goes; I live and learn - easy come, easy go (I keep telling myself). Still I wonder Why the family never told me anything about it. Then to add to our ledger I read an order from War Dept. saying we have to stay here (foreign service) for one year, getting leave after 125 hours, and then for one week. That gives us two weeks after 250 combat hours and the British get 6 months - but then I haven't approved of a lot the British did. But I would like to add that the very least Uncle Sammy could have done for us is put it on an hourly basis, for there are some (all the 17 crews nearly) lads with us that have been here more than 6 months and have yet to go on their first mission. It just isn't fair or right in any sense of the word. Boy, what a future, according to that piece of paper _ it is a damned cinch that by the end of a year the big boys who sit on their ass in Washington won't have to worry about transporting many of us back - Christ, we'll be completely expended.