Harry Halverson

Harry Halverson was the CO of HALPRO and the 1st Provisional BG.

Born 27 May 1895, Boone, IA. Air Corps Tactical School, 1936; Command and General Staff School, 1937. Served to grade of Private First Class, Signal Enlisted Reserve Corps, February-July 1918; commissioned Second Lieutenant, Air Service, July 1918. Career assignments include: various duties as company and field grade officer, 1918-1941, including participation in the First Around-the-World Flight, 1924; Commander, 1st Provisional Group, 1941-1943; Commander, 26th Anti-Submarine Wing, Eastern Defense Command, 1942-1943; Chief, Organizational Branch, Special Planning Division, HQ USAAF, 1943-1944; Commander, West Coast Wing, Air Transport Command, 1944-1946. Retired June 1946. Died 11 May 1978, St Helena, CA.


USAF Fact Sheet Biography

Awards

Silver Star
Awarded for actions during the World War II

SYNOPSIS: Colonel (Air Corps) Harry A. Halverson (ASN: 0-11444), United States Army Air Forces, was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action while serving with the First Provisional Group (Heavy), Middle East Air Forces, in action on 12 June 1942, during the HALPRO bombing raid over Ploesti, Romania.

General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army Forces in the Middle East, General Orders No. 17 (September 23, 1942)

Action Date: 12-Jun-42

Service: Army Air Forces

Rank: Colonel

Regiment: First Provisional Group (H)

Division: Middle East Air Force


Distinguished Flying Cross
Awarded for actions during the Peace Time Awards

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross to First Lieutenant (Air Corps) Harry A. Halverson (ASN: 0-11444), U.S. Army Air Corps, for extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial flight. From 1 - 7 January 1929. Lieutenant Halverson, with Second Lieutenant Elwood R. Quesada, Air Corps, acted as relief pilot of the air plane Question Mark on the refueling flight, at and near Los Angeles, California. which remained in the air a total of 150 hours 40 minutes and 15 seconds, a period of continuous flight longer than any previous flight ever accomplished. by their endurance, resourcefulness and determination they demonstrated future possibilities in aviation which were heretofore not appreciated, and thus reflected great credit upon themselves and the Army of the United States.

General Orders: War Department, General Orders No. 7 (1929)

Action Date: January 1 - 7, 1929

Service: Army Air Forces

Rank: First Lieutenant